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Carpet Barn Bristol





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carpet barn bristol - Not Afraid




Not Afraid of Life: My Journey So Far


Not Afraid of Life: My Journey So Far



Bristol Palin lived the life of an average American teen. She loved being outdoors, spending time with family and friends, and focusing on schoolwork and sports. But when her mother became the Republican vice presidential candidate in 2008, Bristol’s world would change forever. She was instantly propelled into the national spotlight, becoming the focus of intense public and national media scrutiny at the age of seventeen.
In the pages of this personal memoir, Bristol opens up for the first time ever, taking readers behind the scenes of her life, from growing up in Alaska to coming of age amid the media and political frenzy surrounding her mother’s political rise; from becoming a single mother while still a teenager to coping as her relationship with the baby’s father crumbled publicly—not once, but twice. Through all of these ups and downs, Bristol learned how to face her challenges head-on with courage and grace, traits she put to good use as a contestant and finalist on Dancing with the Stars.
In Not Afraid of Life, Bristol speaks candidly of her aspirations and of the deep religious faith that gives her strength and inspiration. Plainspoken and disarmingly down-to-earth, Bristol offers new insight and understanding of who she is and what she values most.

Product Description
The oldest daughter of Sarah Palin and single mother goes beyond the headlines, offering readers an inside look at her life, her world, and the things that matter most, including her family and the faith that keeps her centered. When her mother became the Republican Vice-Presidential candidate in 2008, Bristol Palin was instantly propelled into the national spotlight, becoming the focus of intense public and national media scrutiny at the age of seventeen.
In Not Afraid of Life, Bristol gives readers an intimate behind-the-scenes look at her life for the first time, from growing up in Alaska to coming of age amid the media and political frenzy surrounding her mother’s political rise; from becoming a single mother while still a teenager to coping as her relationship with her baby’s father crumbled publicly—not once, but twice. Bristol talks about the highs and lows of her appearance on ABC-TV’s Dancing with the Stars, including the aching hours of practice, the biting criticisms, and the thrill of getting to the show’s finals. She speaks candidly of her aspirations for the future and the deep religious faith that gives her strength and inspiration. Plainspoken and disarmingly down to earth, Bristol offers new insight and understanding of who she is and what she values most.
A Look Inside Not Afraid of Life
Click on the images below to open larger versions.

I fished in the Mat-Su Borough from a young age. Here I am on a fishing trip with my grandfather at Willow Creek.After an interview near the Statue of Liberty I was the only student to accept a diploma while wearing baby puke on my dress. Piper is dressed up in my graduation gown while I hold Tripp and McKinley looks on.One of the most challenging parts of competing on Dancing with the Stars was not being able to hang out with Tripp as much as I wanted to! His on-set visits energized me.Our home overlooks Lake Lucille, which freezes completely solid during the winter. Tripp is learning how to ice-skate on this cold day. Maybe one day he’ll follow in my brother Track’s steps and become a great hockey player!

Bristol Palin lived the life of an average American teen. She loved being outdoors, spending time with family and friends, and focusing on schoolwork and sports. But when her mother became the Republican vice presidential candidate in 2008, Bristol’s world would change forever. She was instantly propelled into the national spotlight, becoming the focus of intense public and national media scrutiny at the age of seventeen.
In the pages of this personal memoir, Bristol opens up for the first time ever, taking readers behind the scenes of her life, from growing up in Alaska to coming of age amid the media and political frenzy surrounding her mother’s political rise; from becoming a single mother while still a teenager to coping as her relationship with the baby’s father crumbled publicly—not once, but twice. Through all of these ups and downs, Bristol learned how to face her challenges head-on with courage and grace, traits she put to good use as a contestant and finalist on Dancing with the Stars.
In Not Afraid of Life, Bristol speaks candidly of her aspirations and of the deep religious faith that gives her strength and inspiration. Plainspoken and disarmingly down-to-earth, Bristol offers new insight and understanding of who she is and what she values most.










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Oldland Hall Longwell Green South Gloucestershire BS30




Oldland Hall Longwell Green South Gloucestershire BS30





On the main Bath Road which passes through Longwell Green, stands Oldland Hall, a large Georgian style building with a central two storied block and two recessed wings. The main block has a central porch which stands proud from the structure of the building and has been built with its own pediment. On the ground floor, there are, at least, 4 rooms, and a wide open staircase lit by a splendid large window which rises the full height of the building from the porch below, and contrasts in style to the ground floor windows and its two first floor neighbours. Above these windows, the front of the main building rises above the roof level, and helped to create attic space for a number of servants bedrooms.

The two wings are structurally very similar to each other, in both size and appearance, except that the left-hand wing has french doors leading from the Dining Room, out onto a raised terrace, whilst the right-hand wing, has a conservatory built across almost the whole of the ground floor rooms, and out to the building line of the main structure. Both have a stone carved acorn adorning the extreme front corners of the house.

It is believed that Oldland Hall was built around 1800, but so far, it has not been established when, or whether the house was originally built as described above, or whether the wings and/or other items were added at a later stage.

Who had the house built and who first lived there has also not yet been established, but what is known, is that some time during the 1840’s, the house was acquired by the well known local entre-preneur, Henry Hill Budgett. After his death in 1849, Oldland Hall was put up for sale on the 18 March 1850 and, from the Bill of Sale it is possible to determine that there then existed a large size Dining Room, (the carpet is recorded as being in size 17ft by 12ft.), a Drawing Room in which there was a rosewood drawing room suite, with blue damask coverings, plus a library containing 500 books and stuffed foreign birds, a servants’ hall, kitchen, and a cellar (well stocked with a number of 36 and 28 gallon casks and other brewing utensils). Outside, there was a tool house, a workshop, a cart house, a barn, cow and hen houses, pig-sty, plus an orchard, gardens and fields.

The identity of the person who purchased Oldland Hall from the estate of the late Mr.Budgett has not yet been determined, and in fact, there is a gap of 60 years or so before the next owner is positively identified.

Around 1910/12, Oldland Hall was acquired by Admiral and Mrs Arden-Close, who then proceeded to open the hall as a residential home for girls. In the 1914 Gloucestershire Directory, the entry reads, "Diocesan Bristol, Home for girls under the Church of England Society for providing Homes for Waifs and strays, (Miss Mary Humphries matron)" No doubt it was opened with good intent, and with the pious belief that orphaned girls and/or girls from dubious backgrounds needed strict control of their moral and physical upbringing. The staff all wore a nurses style uniform, whilst the girls wore long black dresses, over which they had a white smock.

How successful the Admiral and his wife were in educating and moulding the young girls is not known, but the enterprise probably lasted around 20 years as far as Oldland Hall was concerned for, by 1932/33, the house had reverted to a single family occupancy when, Mr. W. Bence, the local coach-builder and bus proprietor, acquired the Hall. It is believed that he stayed there until his death, and that for a period of time, particularly after the Second World War, the Hall was put to a number of different uses. Nowadays it has a multiple occupancy.











William Bence & Sons Longwell Green South Gloucestershire




William Bence & Sons Longwell Green South Gloucestershire





William Bence and Sons BS30.

Towards Bitton, on the left hand side of the Bath road, where the Carpet Barn and Auto Save Car Showroom can now be seen today just before the roundabout. From the 1890’s a high quality wheelwright and wagon business had been run from here and was owned by William Bence. The Bence family originally lived in a cottage in Kingsfield Lane, later moving to Salisbury House at the bottom of Hoopers Drive. However, when Oldland Hall ceased to be a home for girls the Bence family moved there. In the 1920’s Mr. Bence started an omnibus service and the coaches were made on his premises at Longwell Green.

These buses were welcomed particularly in Longwell Green as such a long walk was necessary from the end of the tramway at Hanham. In 1897 Hanham Abbots Parish Council had discussed approaching the Tramway Co. with a view to having the tramway (described as a "light railway") extended to Longwell Green. Plans were drawn up and in 1904 the Parish Council discussed the possibility of requesting two or three lights for the village if the line was extended - but it never happened.









carpet barn bristol








carpet barn bristol




Barn: Preservation & Adaptation The Evolution of a Vernacular Icon






Returning to the subject of their bestselling book Barn (1992), David Larkin, with barn preservationists Elric Endersby and Alexander Greenwood, takes the reader on a tour of barns throughout America. Featuring all-new sites and structures, Barn is a perfect introduction for those not yet initiated into the world of barns as well as a definitive resource for all barn owners and architecture enthusiasts.

The book discusses the form and function of American barns. It gives their complete history--from Colonial times to the present, the old and the new--and illustrates the incredible range of styles of these structures. From rural villages in New England to the farmlands of the Midwest, from the Deep South to the Southwest, and up and down the West Coast, Barn: Preservation & Adaptation fully demonstrates the adaptability and enduring charm of one of the most iconic forms of American vernacular architecture.

Today there is great activity restoring and converting barns. No longer used just for farming, barns have been converted into bookstores, theaters, restaurants, garages, and even houses. Barn explores renovations, interior design options, and structural and cosmetic changes that have kept these traditional farm buildings vital and functional into the twenty-first century.

This highly engaging history and the profound beauty of these handcrafted structures will enchant all barn aficionados interested in their architecture and their historic preservation.










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